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, marcusreddeker.com. >>> from the 17th annual texas book festival in successen, texas, we discuss the book "syria: the fall of the house oo assad." >> thank you so much foruch for spending part of your afternoony with us here.s i would like to welcome you alle on behalf of the professor and myself. this is afessor l wesonderful s. i'm saying that dispassionately, and we're so happy you're here.r i wanted to introduce the profe professor to you. he is asch to professor of middt history at trinity university it san antonio. professor lesch is a prolific writer writer and thinker about the the middle east and what's happening in the region. it's really a treat tosy a havem here today.he h w he's written his new book n b "syria: the fall of the house ou assad" which i'm hoping you'll m all purchase and get him toill sign. he signed my copy first so he f. has met extensively with met president assad and officials lg between 2004-2011, been in the middle east, studying the middle st east, making connections andeast friendships in the middle east for a quar ater century. the r why that's important is, o
, secretary panetta, since president obama made a statement about syria and chemical weapons again and secretary clinton did, we understand the red line, but the world this week certainly growing concern about syria's potential use of chemical weapons. can we ask you your view on this, how concerned are you? how imminent are your concerns? should assad believe that his weapons are sheltered and safe from potential response, a potential military action by anyone? >> well, without commenting on the specific intelligence that we have with regards to the chemical weapons, i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned that as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. the whole world is watching. the whole world's watching very closely. the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be cons qenszs. -- consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their open people. i'm not going to s
a deteriorating situation in syria. why turkey says the bashar al-assad regime may be coming for it next and what our nato ally says it needs to protect its own people. we have a live report just ahead. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >> reporter: they are trying to push forward and march towards the presidential palace. it's a risky move that could cause conflict of supporters of mohammed morsi. the riot police seem to have the protestors bottled up in the square. the goal to march on the presidential palace failed today for the opposition. jenna: the question is whether we are headed toward potentially more violence in the streets. we'll keep an eye on what is happening in the streets today. jon: high levels of a deadly gas forced the evacuation of an elementary school forcing dozen of stud
to the syrians after the fall of the regime, because syria is not like libya. libya, at least the had resources, their own resources sources. syria has nothing except human beings. syria, the capital is one of the old as capitals in the world. this is why if syria -- they need international support. the only way to invest in syria in the future, by building strong internationally. build a strong the national education system. this is the only way you can invest in syrians. this is why syria has to have a long-term plan to recover. syria needs at least $60 billion to recover. with all the destruction that we have in all of our cities. i will end here and i will be more than happy to answer questions that you have a. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> the first thing i would like to ask you, trying to look more into the new syrian position, my concern is that the rights of the minorities and in the new syrian opposition has not been really addressed as the same issues were also presented. how do you address this issue? your last. trying to think about what is going to happen
to state conflict, a conflict between israel and jordan, israel and syria and israel and egypt. this became a new conflict that emerged, one between israel and the palestinians. before 1967, you really didn't hear about the palestinians. it's not by accident a year after the war ended in 1968, the p.l.o., under yasser arafat, emerges as this powerful force in the arab world. we have been living with that as well. 1967 war was also inaugurated the strategic relationship between the united states and israel. people forget that israel fought the 1967 war not with american arms but with french weaponry. france was their principal ally. before 1967, one israeli prime minister one time for one hour had visited the white house. it wasn't israel's founder. june 1964. today ariel sharon or any israeli prime minister comes to washington, it's obvious he will march into the white house. that began that very, very close relationship, that cooperation began in the aftermath of 1967, not before that. >> as you acknowledge, one more book on the six-day war. there have been a lot of them. what do you have
again. in jordan, all the suspects have moved in and out of syria where weapons and jihadist fighters are plentiful, another sign the syrian civil war is spilling over into jordan, where the u.s. has a large stake in the survival of that government. >> to put it mildly, jordan is one of america's closest allies in that part of the world. if anything were to happen to that government, to that regime, to the kingdom there, that would be a huge loss for the u.s. >> reporter: absolutely it would. analysts say the jordanian intelligence service is one of the best in the entire region. it works very closely with u.s. intelligence to share information on terrorist cells there. if that government falls, a lot of that is compromised or lost. a huge loss for america's assets in that region. >> brian todd, thanks very much. let's get some perspective now from the jordanian foreign minister, nasser judeh. thanks for coming in. how close was al qaeda to blowing up, destroying the u.s. embassy in amman? >> they had just moved into operational phase when they thwarted that attempt. we had been monit
? >> greta: this is a fox news alert. syria's military is loading deadly sarin gas into bombs and now the military is awaiting word from president assad to unleash on his own people. a senior u.s. official telling fox news the chemical weapons have been locked and loaded into aiaerial bombs. if the gas is discharged, it will only take one minute to kill tens of thousands of people, just one minute. there's nothing the u.s. military or any military can do to help them once it's been released. fox news national security correspondent jennifer griffin has the latest. jennifer? >> reporter: according to a source i spoke to moments ago, the sarin gas could be deliverable in civil ways, but it's believed t to have been placed in fracture i can'table s that can be dropped from planes. according to the source, they think it's in aerosol form. the u.s. military is making contingency plans should assad leave suddenly. there are indications that various middle eastern countries are trying to find a place to give assad asylum according to diplomatic sources. as you mentioned, senior u.s. official
>> panic and terror as dozens are killed in central syria. the attack happened as the u.n.'s arab league mediator lakhdar brahimi arrived for more talks. hello. this is al jazeera, live from london. also coming up -- protesters take to the streets in the thousands over a brutal gang rape. after weeks of suspense, mario monti said he will not run for reelection. but he could lead of future italian government. and the head of the u.s. gold lobby goes on -- the u.s. gun lobby goes on television to defend his position that guns should be in every school. and trouble in south africa. hello there. welcome to the program. all they were trying to do was buy bread. it turned into a tragedy in central syria. dozens of people are reported to have died when the bakery they were queuing at was destroyed. the un envoy arrived in syria for more talks. we have this. >> panic, chaos, anger. this is the aftermath of what the opposition says was an air strike carried out by a syrian fighter jet. those killed and wounded were queueing outside a bakery. only five days ago, this area was under the cont
about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effective controls on the sale of guns. roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchasing. i don't see any reason why someone should be able to purchase military style or body armor or weapons. only the police and the military should have that. >> let's start off. you've been giving me a holler on twitter about this. you are a big gun fan. explain to me why bob costas is wrong? >> it boils down to the ability to protect yourself, piers. when you look at what is what happening in syria with the threat of chemical weapons. the only reason they're not going to use it is because someb
senator mccain will be talking about syria very shortly. do either of you have any thoughts on that? >> i'm coming back >> senators talking about the passage of the russian trade bill, the vote on the floor of the senate a short while ago was 92-4. a look -- the senate continues in session with a vote coming up likely this afternoon, possible vote on the -- we had bep told there was a news conference happening on c-span. >> good afternoon, i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator leeber and senator graham and we are deeply disturbed by reports that assad may have weapononized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines an
decision and new job. and syria's civil war is in a very dangerous perhaps decisive tipping point right now. can the world prevent bashar al assad from using chemical weapons against his own people? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with president obama taking his battle to extend tax cuts for the middle class into the heart of the middle class suburb today. he visited a family just outside washington, d.c., using their story to dramatize what will happen in just 26 days if he and congress can't make a deal on the so-called fiscal cliff. a source of great concern for so many people, everyone's taxes will go up, will go up if there's no deal. let's go live to our white house correspondent dan lothian. he's on the scene for us over at the white house. how did it go, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, we've seen the president do this before in the past whenever he's locked in negotiations with lawmakers. he heads out on the road, either goes to a backyard or sits down around a dinner table to put pressure on congress. that's what he did today when he went to falls churc
: good evening i'm eliot spitzer and this is "viewpoint." after months of bloodshed in syria, the u.s. could be close to recognizing the country's rebel coalition. cairo's tahrir square is once again the scene of angry protests and as the islam mist dominated constituent assembly pushes you through the draft constitution. yes, the middle east is living down to its reputation as the world's leading source of turmoil. we start tonight in syria. the damascus airport was reopened friday following fighting that saw international flights canceled thursday republics say they destroyed regular syrian army vehicles near the airport while syrian military jets bombed damascus suburbs that are the strongholds for the rebellan. the rebels have enjoyed a series of tactical successes in the recent weeks capturing air bases and military supplies. the rebels have also scored on the diplomatic front as britain, france, turkey and the gulf cooperation council recently recognized their umbrella group the national coalition of syrian revolutionary and oppositional forces as the legitimate representative
the cliff a better alternative. plus, mayhem in the middle east as worries grow that syria may use chemical weapons and egypt moves closer to civil war. can the u.s. stay on the sidelines much longer? and a military judge moved from the trial of ahsan after demanding the army major shave. did the order show bias? >> ♪ >> welcome to the journal, he editorial report. little progress this week in evidence to avoid january's looming tax hikes and spending cuts commonly known as the fiscal cliff. despite a call between president obama and john boehner, the two sides appear to be no closer to a compromise. are republicans working on the scenes on a plan b? wall street journal columnist, dan henninger and kim strassel. you have bean working the phones, is there something going on between speaker boehner and the president? >> no, i think that they are nowhere and it's because the president is refusing to budge at all on the top toks ratestopx rates and we'll go off the cliff if the republicans don't acreed to that demand. so we're still at a stand still. >> paul: kim, why is the president so ins
>>> on the broadcast tonight, chemical weapons in syria, suddenly the world has an urgent situation on its hands. the fear is, syria is going to use it against its own people. >>> and the fight on breast cancer, the controversy on the life-saving drug, and how long women should take it. >>> and 27 days to go when the fiscal cliff arrives, so why are so many members of the house going home when they're supposed to be working on it? >>> and people showing up for others, right when they need it. nightly news begins now. >>> good evening, we begin tonight with an important story, details of which may sound very familiar to a lot of americans, given our history over the past few years in places like iraq. tonight, pentagon sources are telling nbc news syria is preparing chemical weapons for their possible use against the syrian people in the form of aerial bombs. it is believed this specific intelligence is the reason why president obama took a hard line against syria just a few days ago, warning them there would be consequences if these weapons were used. let's begin here tonight with t
on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his unusual prescience congressman royce also foreseen many of the developments we witnessed of late in the midd
are speaking only about foreign policy and in particular in a very focused way on syria. i do want to thank those who made this possible and as chairman of the key subcommittee i value the work that you do, each of you do on a range of policies, whether it is the security of our troops in afghanistan, syria which i will focus on but also the work you do to strengthen our policy as it relates to the regime in iran. your team has brought to the forefront carefully thought out and persuasive research and policy positions that have been an outstanding resource for those of us in congress and i am grateful for that help. i know that the theme of this year's forum is, quote, dictators and dissidents:should the west choose sides? quite topical given the events that have played out most recently whether it is the arabs spring, or nascent democratic openings, i would argue the central question maybe is one of process. that question being whether the u.s. the west should support the democratic process such that citizens are able to choose their own leaders. even when the process gives rise to politic
. it is not taxpayer they were released in syria, but they escaped after a firefight. we will hear from richard engel about the psychological torture he encured at the hands of the syrian regime. you take the picture. you ed it the picture. you post the picture online and now facebook's new acquisition will sell that picture without paying you or even telling you. >> a kidnapping, and days of psychological torture, a firefight between firefights and pro government thugs that is what a veteran journalists survived in war torn syria the man in question is the nbc news chief foreign affairs correspondent, richard engel who once worked here. he and his team were traveling with a group of rebels near the border with turkey and iranian-trained gunman loyal to bashar al-assad ambushed them, executed at least one of the rebels, and took them into captivity. >> they kept us blindfolded, bound, we we were not physically beaten, but psychological torture, threats of being killed, saying we would have to choose who would be shot first. >>shepard: as they were blindfolded they wondered what was going on. richard
to syria is like coming up from liberal humanists because we tend to say all dictators are bad, all democrats are good, you know, we eliminate and eraser distinctions and it's the distinctions that give the complexity we need to understand the world, and yet they ran a brutal dictatorship that was nothing like saddam hussein. and i had my passport taken away for ten days while the iraqi authorities when i was in kurdistan that time i was very near dayton nervous it i got back from the airport before i left and i was a journalist that got too close to my story and i was intent on eliminating saddam hussein. i believe like a lot of people in different western countries in the world and on both sides of the aisle that there was wmd. but more importantly, i believe the regime is suffocating and brutal and you couldn't trust it. you have to assume that it existed. the war turned out. i'm not a fatalist what we had a different strategies it could have been different. we cannot say that it wouldn't matter no matter what we did put on the other hand, a lot of the mistakes we made were impli
the opportunity to diverse, talk about afghanistan, bahrain, syria, talk about this, that, and so the agenda has to be narrow as a need of focusing on the issue of the principle concern. that's one. that's con accept issue, as far as i can tell was never resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo revails. i suspect, given the fact the issue of a bilateral conversation is a last ditch effort, likely to remain focused. should it be considered a last ditch effort? i don't think so. you talk about years of decision, the year of that, the year of that. we have more time on this issue. it's a paradoxical one. think about it as not having the time, yet, there's always more time. you know, everybody, so this is in 2008, 2009, somehow this issue seems to have within its urgency a degree of time flexibility. i don't know how to explain that. we have had bilateral discussions before in october 2009, most collectly. if there's a bilateral one to take place, which tends to condition the agenda that's going to be discussed. >> marina, bringing you in on this, ray said we need a sense of modest
. since 1962, the state has been highly centralized. the state to maintain control of everything in syria even if you permit to apply for a open a store. you have to check first with security forces. people in syria have to do this very well with almost no funding or very little funding. they also have to operate in abnormal circumstances. there is aleppo the city and also the periphery. they make up the province. all of the periphery has been liberated. when i was in aleppo i missed the hustle and bustle of the city. the first thing i did their was i was hosted by the revolutionary transition. they come together into what they can to fill this void. we took a tour of the city. most of the shops where closed down. some were not. i wanted to find out that was trying to function as a transitional government structure. to be honest with you, i am using a lot though as a case in point. to be honest, i thought i was going to meet with simple people. the conflict has not yet come to an end. we were pleasantly surprised. the operation we encountered was a lot more specific than we thought. they
're take you around the world in 60 minutes. syria, rebels taken full control of a military base north of the key city aleppo. some rebels named by the u.s. state department terrorists. they designated a terrorist group linked to al qaeda in iraq. the department imposed sanctions. what does it mean to sort out good rebels from bad? nick paton walsh explains. >> reporter: not only look different, black flags, well armed and disciplined, they fight differently, too. using suicide tactics and mass casualty car bombs, radical extremists but undeniably effective. behind a stream of rebel victories, overrunning regime bases across syria, many thinking the end of assad is nearer than ever. why has the united states, who also want assad gone, black listed them as terrorists? >> we've had concerns that al nusra is little more than a front for al qaeda in iraq who has moved some of its operations into syria. >> reporter: that link clear in the document filed monday, al nusra deemed not a new group, another name for al qaeda in iraq. u.s. officials believing insurgents who kill americans in iraq
about a deadly threat with word tonight that threat could be real. the u.s. is warning syria there will be consequences. if chemical weapons are used on opposition forces. in that country civil war. connor powell is following the story from jerusalem. >> syrian jets continue pounding opposition fighters outside damascus. the u.s. intelligence officials tell fox news that they may be planning to release deadlier weapons. stock piles to use on the opposition forces. late today, president obama warned the syrian president. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching. if you make the mistake of using the weapons you will be held accountable. >> this is hours after mr. obama secretary of state on a visit to czech republic laid down the marker. >> we made our views clear. >> the officials responded saying they would never use chemical weapons against its own people. a rebel stronghold, civilians and children were attacked by pro-assad forces who killed and wounded dozens. a move to prevent fighting to spill over the border, nato will have p
to turkey, hillary clinton warns syria against moving its chemical weapons. >> this is a red line for the united states. i'm not going to telegraph in any specifics what we are would do in the event of credible evidence that the assad regime has resorted to using chemical weapons against their own people, but suffice it to say, we are certainly planning to take action if that eventuality were to occur. >> and while washington buzzes over this video tribute to clinton, some are asking is it a farewell to the secretary or prelude to 2016? honoring the icons. politics meets hollywood. a tribute to the arts. president obama finds a way to salute an eclectic group of honor honorees. >> we've got my guy sitting next to dustin hoffman. dave letterman alongside one of the greatest ballerinas of all time. i couldn't think dave dances. there's no smooth transition from ballerina to led skep lin. they redefine the rock and roll lifestyle. we do not have video of this. there was some hotel rooms trashed and mayhem all around. so it's fitting that we're doing this in a room with windows about
deadly plan. >>> as a deadly bloody civil war rages in syria, the opposition gets new support from around the wormed and the united states. what president obama just said. and a look how this crisis figures in the foreign policy challenges mr. obama faces in his section term. that is -- second term. that is next. [shouting] having you ship my gifts couldn't be easier. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. jon: right now some new information on crime stories we're keeping an eye on. police say the man who confessed to murdering an alaska barista also planned to kill her boyfriend. before israel keyes committed suicide in jail he told investigators he new samantha koenig's boyfriend was coming to pick her up from work but he later changed his mind about killing him. police say keyes also confessed to seven other murders across the country but they don't yet know the i.d.'s of his victims. >>> 7-year-old austin sigg is retu
tonight. coming up next, the middle east, the starting with the powder keg in syria and what the u.s. should do about it. >> eliot: for over 20 months syria has been torn asundayer by a civil war that has left close to 50,000 dead and forced other 400,000 to flee the country. as has been observed, syria will explode out, not in. as the turmoil and flood of refugees have created mayhem in turkey, jordan and other surrounding nations. now with fears that president syria's president basher al-assad will use chemical weapons our rhetoric has been definitive, saying use would cross red line and spark immediate response. now most now agree as i do, that we have to do much more. joining me now is james jeffrey former u.s. ambassador to iraq, turkey and albania who previously served on the national security council as assistant to the president and deputy national security adviser and joe cirincione president of plowshares fund and author of " "bomb scare." thank you for joining me tonight tonight. >> our pleasure. >> how do you assess the changing dynamic in syria where the forces seem t
of syria eventually. so we have to be very careful. be part of the settlement, with a gap between what people think about the settlement out of court and the jury-ish community and about the reality. maybe you can tell me, do you know what is the actual percentage of settlement of jewish homes occupying land in judea and samaria? sound settlement, what is actual on the ground that she had occupied the lands? anyone? >> is 3%. i wish it was 50, 90 or 100%. but it's not the case. it is vacant. the idea that the jews cannot leave, because we do not have peace i do not accept it. to date israel with arab israelis, 20% in the week. they live like i live, vote like i vote and nobody tell them if you've not lived there, you have to move out. we have to get to the understanding that it's not about the settlement. it's much deeper than that. [inaudible] >> that is the question? i am 41, ma'am. i do not -- and said what you want. did you get peace? what did it get? [inaudible] >> i think my point is very clear that history has told us we cannot wait and we cannot get to a point when people speak
correspondent free after gunmen took him hostage in syria. and now he's talking about his ordeal. >> the last five days were days that we would rather forget. >> shepard: tonight the kidnapped, the captivity and incredible escape during a fire fight. but first from fox this tuesday night, why? that's been the question. why did he do it? why would anybody kill his mother and go on a rampage in an elementary school? tonight there is word of a possible motive in the newtown massacre. a man who says he knew the shooter's family tells fox news.com that adam lanza was upset because his mother was planning to commit him to a psychiatric facility. we can't confirm that, but a senior law enforcement official does back it up. saying investigators are looking at whether lanza was angry over plans for his future mental health treatment. police say lanza shot and killed his mother friday morning before driving to that elementary school. there they say he murdered 20 children and six adults and then killed himself. we have team fox coverage. molly line on how kids are going back to school. first to rick le
and israel to deal with the ongoing revolutions customer the descent into chaos and syria, the growing divide that is spreading across the arab world and the broader middle east, iran's nuclear weapons program, and the absence of an effort to resolve the israeli-palestinian conflict. these are questions and many others that we will have a chance to discuss this weekend. like me, you, i'd just can now wait to get started then that we have a very special guest tonight to get us started. i am very grateful to him for joining us tonight. we have tried for many years to have him join us at the forum. some of you misremember he was here five years ago before he became the foreign minister. since then, we have not had the pleasure for one reason or another. i am grateful that he is going to start us off today than the y today. the leader of th he is now the number two leader of the party and now the foreign minister in the current government of israel. to interview him tonight and to conduct conversations with him before we have a chance to ask him some questions, we are very grateful to robert sieg
chemical weapons. syria says it would never use the chemical weapons against its own people but warns that terrorists could use it against the people. >>> and linebacker jerry brown, a dallas cowboy, a member of the team's practice squad was pronounced dead at the hospital. he was riding in a car driven by josh brent, the starting nose tackle. brent has been arrested on suspicion of intoxication manslaughter. police say the player's mercedes was traveling at high speed when it hit a curb, flipped and caught fire. >>> and same-sex couples getting their day in court. today, the supreme court decided to hear cases regarding federal laws, one regarding the defense of marriage act, or doma, involving couples legally married in their own state. the other is a challenge to california's prop 8, which took away the rates of same-sex marriage that had been previously approved by state courts. >>> the top story this hour, a man considered the leader of a terrorist network, now in custody in egypt. this is why we're paying attention to this man. u.s. officials believe his group had something to d
. it is a good question. i think the syrians situation is different from the iraq situation. syria reminds me more of the balkans in the 1990's. the internal conflict is horrendous. i think it is different in this respect. not even the syrians want the united states to invade and takeover syria and administrate it. that is not the issue in the case of syria. the issue is whether the united states should supply weapons to factions fighting the regime that are aligned with our interests, and if we do not do this, will the more extreme elements support the radical islamic rebels fighting assad? we want the people to prevail better closer to our interests, yet we are not supporting the materially. reports from serious say there is resentment on this. al qaeda in iraq is now heavily involved in the syrian conflict. one reason is able to do that is we took all our forces out of iraq in 2011. if we had to several thousand forces working with iraqi special operation forces, i believe we could have attenuated the growth of applied it -- of al qaeda in syria. this is a result of the removal of all forc
people and nows that ha chemical weapon. now big is syria's president to our national security. tony shaffer is here next with his thoughts. he is meant to bring joy at christmas time. this is an that is stirring up trouble instead. controversy coming up. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and share something... ♪ ♪ ...or you can get out there with your friends and actually share something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. and also to build my career. so i'm not about to always let my frequent bladder urges, or the worry my pipes might leak get in the way of my busy lifestyle. that's why i take care, with vesicare. once-daily vesicare can help control your bladder muscle and is proven to treat overactive bladder with sympts of frequent urges and leaks day and night. if you have certain stomach or glaucoma problems, or trouble emptying your bladder, do not take vesicare. vesicare may cause allergic reactions that may be serious. if you experience swellin
the morning talking about syria. the regime with one of the large stockpiles of chemical weapons in the world and biological weapons. a man who has slaughtered 40,000 as some people and clearly is capable of slaughtering many, many more. and i certainly learned a lot from these individuals who are sitting here. one thing i learned just the other day which i was aware of actually from the board is that since world war ii in the least has seen more weapons of mass destruction attacks than any other place on earth. just to go through the list here which may or may not be aware of, egyptians use toggle weapons against yemen between 1963 and 1967. in 1986 the iraqis used chemical weapons against iranians and it is reported that iranians use chemical weapons against iraqis. in 1987 as a chemical weapons against chad. and, of course, as most of you remember, saddam hussein used mustard gas against the kurds. and those of the years when the middle east was stable. think about that. that was when stability brought. well, now we're in the middle of the great arab revolt. the great arab revolt means tha
following days of anti-government rallies and clashes. >>> fighting continues to rage in syria's civil war. syrian rebels say they have surrounded the country's main airport on one side. they say they're trying to keep the country's war jets grounded and stop its flow of weapons. syrian state run tv insists the airport is running normally. >>> ford is issuing a voluntary recall of its ford escape models today following reports of overheating followed by vehicle fires. no injury is reported. if you own one of these models, ford advises you to consult your dealer immediately. repair procedures still not known. >>> for a small fighter, hector camacho often seemed larger than life. that life ended early. he was shot last week outside a bar near san juan and died a week ago. he will be buried nay the bronx. >>> and today marks world aids day. the white house marking the event by displaying a red ribbon, an international symbol of support and awareness. president obama says in part that the united states is committed to preventing the disease's spread and "end this pandemic once and for all." >>
if those two groups cross paths. thank you. >>> this morning calming words on syria amid fears the crumbling regime could unleash chemical weapons on its own people. days after the u.s. and other countries warned embattled president bashar al assad against such action, defense secretary leon panetta says syria may be backing away from the threat. here is what pa net ta said early this morning on a flight to kuwait city. >> we haven't seen anything new indicating any aggressive steps to move forward in that way, but we continue to monitor it very closely and we continue to make clear to them that they should not under any means make use of these chemical weapons against their own population. >> and here's an example of how just murky the divisions are in syria, later today washington will declare one of the group of rebels a foreign terrorist organization. according to federal documents the group is merely another alias or al qaeda in iraq. >>> this morning we know the name of the navy s.e.a.l. killed during a raid to rescue a kidnapped american doctor in afghanistan. the s.e.a.
: if there is further military action in syria, does that have any impact? guest: the pentagon would need funding for those things. when libya came up, the pentagon does what it is told to do and goes and fights and goes back to congress and says, "now you need to make us whole." in iraq, there were supplemental appropriations. the pentagon will do what it needs to do. it will go back to congress and say, now we need the money to make up for things we spend money on the war. host: this comes from twitter. guest: that is a tough question. i do not know. once you get up to major, lieutenant colonel, you are getting close to that number. they indoor tremendous hardships and often cannot buy a home because they are a mother around so much. there are a lot of sacrifices that goes on. host: scott in woodbridge, virginia. caller: good morning. i am a former marine and a military brat. my father retired from the navy. i have a long history of active duty. i think there is misinformation going on this morning. talk about $800 billion for the wars in the middle east. we spent double that on the stimulus pl
. the fighting in syria spilling over into neighboring lebanon. supporters and opponents of assad exchanging fire there. four people have been kill and a dozen wounded. >>> on violent end to a standoff at a fast-food restaurant. sacramento police and swatted teams surrounding this jack-in-the-box yesterday. investigators say that a suspect held two female hostages inside for at least three hours. one of the women reportedly escaped on her own and according to reports, officers determined that the remaining hostage was in immediate danger. so police opened fire wounding the suspect. remaining hostage was unhurt. the suspect later died at the hospital. >> gregg: new reaction to that deadly crash involving a dallas cowboys player. josh brent now facing up to 20 years behind bars for alleged drunk driving accident that killed his teammate. casey stegall is live in arlington, texas. >> reporter: today a judge set bail at josh brent at $500,000. his attorney is now saying that is too high. it is more than the cowboys authorized him to pay and he is petitioning to get that lowered. meantime, brent has b
recent power grab. >>> and two days after internet crashed in syria, the coverage wi was restored today. what actually caused it is not clear. but others say it is the work of bashar al-assad's regime. most of those killed in and around syria and aleppo, cnn's arwa damon visited aleppo, and found a nation gripped by civil war. >> reporter: to the tune of jingle bell, a chant in aleppo, with original lyrics. hand in hand, we are all hand in hand, they say, until we get rid of assad. the overwhelming crowd here, for democracy, but also some carrying black flags for islamists. let's agree that each has a right to their perspective. a show of unity, but later islamist groups take up their own chant. the people want an islamic state. when we say we want an islamic state, it means that every citizen will have their rights, he says. islam respects the rights of others, but according to their interpretation. one says, i should cover my hair. twenty-five-year-old hussain says he is not worried they will take over the country. syria is beautiful, a nation of many colors, he says, whether they lik
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